Author: Douglas Gregerson, DC, DACBR

Shoulder MRI

Shoulder MRI

I am not really sure why the topic of shoulder MRI tends to be so popular, but I have a few ideas. Perhaps it is because shoulder problems tend to be a bit more difficult to accurately diagnose. Although that statement may seem misleading, the majority of shoulder pain is due to rotator cuff problems, but the difficulty often lies in trying to distinguish rotator cuff tendinosis from cuff tear.

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MRI Appearance of Rotator Cuff Tears

MRI Appearance of Rotator Cuff Tears

The assessment of the rotator cuff tendon is one of the most common reasons for MR imaging of the shoulder. Most frequently, the study is ordered to rule out a tear. If a tear is present, it is important to define the type of tear and quantify any defects. This information may be useful in determining if conservative care is warranted, or surgery is indicated.

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Hip Stress Fracture

Hip Stress Fracture

I find stress fractures to be a very interesting topic in radiology. Partly this is due to the fact that early on in the evolution of stress fractures, they may be completely invisible on plain film x-ray and yet produce considerable symptomatology clinically. The promoting of increased physical activity seems to be ubiquitous in American society today.

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The MRI Appearance of Meniscal Tears

The MRI Appearance of Meniscal Tears

Tears of the meniscus are quite common and one of the most frequent reasons for imaging the knee. In the last issue, the appearance of normal menisci was discussed. In this column, we will outline the MRI findings indicative of true meniscal tear. Typical planes used for meniscalevaluation include the sagittal images, useful for evaluating the anterior and posterior horns of the meniscus, and the coronal images, which provide a good evaluation of the meniscal bodies.

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