Author: Douglas Gregerson, DC, DACBR

Shoulder Disorders & Spinal Adjustments

MRI Appearance of Rotator Cuff Tears

The assessment of the rotator cuff tendon is one of the most common reasons for MR imaging of the shoulder. Most frequently, the study is ordered to rule out a tear. If a tear is present, it is important to define the type of tear and quantify any defects. This information may be useful in determining if conservative care is warranted, or surgery is indicated.

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Hip Stress Fractures

Hip Stress Fracture

I find stress fractures to be a very interesting topic in radiology. Partly this is due to the fact that early on in the evolution of stress fractures, they may be completely invisible on plain film x-ray and yet produce considerable symptomatology clinically. The promoting of increased physical activity seems to be ubiquitous in American society today.

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The MRI Appearance of Meniscal Tears

The MRI Appearance of Meniscal Tears

Tears of the meniscus are quite common and one of the most frequent reasons for imaging the knee. In the last issue, the appearance of normal menisci was discussed. In this column, we will outline the MRI findings indicative of true meniscal tear. Typical planes used for meniscalevaluation include the sagittal images, useful for evaluating the anterior and posterior horns of the meniscus, and the coronal images, which provide a good evaluation of the meniscal bodies.

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Lumbar Disc Herniation Terminology

Lumbar Disc Herniation Terminology

One of the most common reasons given for ordering a lumbar spine MRI examination is to rule out disc herniation. MRI is a very efficient tool for this condition. It is helpful, however, to define several terms to ensure a clear understanding of the described elements of the report. In the past, there has been considerable variation in the terms used from one radiologist to the next to describe disc herniations.

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Signs and Symptoms of Chondrosarcoma

Signs and Symptoms of Chondrosarcoma

When I taught radiology, I would often ask the following question of my students; What two things do sharks and chondrosarcoma have in common? Although it would seem incongruous to throw in a subject like sharks with a lecture about primary bone tumors, the answer is quite interesting. Both sharks and chondrosarcomas are composed of cartilage (the shark and ray family of fishes have a cartilaginous skeleton, not a bony one).

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